The organs of Paris
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Saint Germain

de l'Auxerrois 1 - 2

2, Place du Louvre, 75001 Paris Orgue de tribune

1771 - FH Cliquot/P Dallery

1791 – CF Clicquot/F Dallery

1809/23/41 - Dallery

1848 - Ducroquet

1864 - Merklin

1900 - Gutschenritter

1970/80 - Adrien Maciet

2008 - Laurent Plet

III/32 - mechanical traction (Barker GO) - stoplist

Photo GO: Jeroen de Haan
Organiste titulaire Henri de Rohan-Csermak Famous organists in the past: Louis-Claude Daquin (around 1738), Alexandre Boëly (1840-1851) Concerts  Seldomly

Masses with organ

Saturday 6.30 PM Sunday 9.30 and 11.30 AM Videos Not available
Saint-Germain-de-l'Auxerrois was the former parish of the kings of France. It was founded in the 7th century and rebuilt several times, giving mixtures of several styles (Roman, Gothic and Renaissance). During the Wars of Religion, the souding of its bell marked the beginning of the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, when thousands of Huguenots were murdered. The north tower was added in 1860 as part of the Mairie of the 1st Arrondissement.
The organ was built by Francois-Henri Clicquot for the Sainte-Chapelle, using the case of Lavergne, designed by Pierre-Noël Rousset (1757). It was transferred to Saint- Germain-de-l'Auxerrois in 1791 and parts of at least two other instruments were incorporated in the newly assembled organ at that time. In the 19th century, the diapasons were modified by Dallery, Ducroquet (under the influence of Boëly) and Merklin, but its classical grand jeu survived. Indeed, most reeds date from before the revolution, although the cromorne of the positive was added some 30 years ago (replacing a historic reed). At that time, a new tierce was added too (replacing the Salicional 4 of Ducroquet). In the period 1995-2005 the organ was completely out of order, but in 2005-2008 works were carried out to make the organ playable again, without any change in the historic materials . A study by Christian Lutz should form the basis for choosing a strategy for a thorough restauration of this unique instrument. 21 out of the 33 stops date from before the revolution. Similar to the organs at St. Roch and St. Laurent, this organ has two faces: a classical face and a 19th century-face.
The organs of Paris

Saint Germain

de l'Auxerrois 1 - 2

2, Place du Louvre, 75001 Paris Orgue de tribune

1771 - FH Cliquot/P Dallery

1791 – CF Clicquot/F Dallery

1809/23/41 - Dallery

1848 - Ducroquet

1864 - Merklin

1900 - Gutschenritter

1970/80 - Adrien Maciet

2008 - Laurent Plet

III/32 - mechanical traction (Barker GO)

- stoplist

Photo GO: Jeroen de Haan
The organ was built by Francois-Henri Clicquot for the Sainte-Chapelle, using the case of Lavergne, designed by Pierre-Noël Rousset (1757). It was transferred to Saint- Germain-de-l'Auxerrois in 1791 and parts of at least two other instruments were incorporated in the newly assembled organ at that time. In the 19th century, the diapasons were modified by Dallery, Ducroquet (under the influence of Boëly) and Merklin, but its classical grand jeu survived. Indeed, most reeds date from before the revolution, although the cromorne of the positive was added some 30 years ago (replacing a historic reed). At that time, a new tierce was added too (replacing the Salicional 4 of Ducroquet). In the period 1995-2005 the organ was completely out of order, but in 2005-2008 works were carried out to make the organ playable again, without any change in the historic materials . A study by Christian Lutz should form the basis for choosing a strategy for a thorough restauration of this unique instrument. 21 out of the 33 stops date from before the revolution. Similar to the organs at St. Roch and St. Laurent, this organ has two faces: a classical face and a 19th century-face.
Saint-Germain-de-l'Auxerrois was the former parish of the kings of France. It was founded in the 7th century and rebuilt several times, giving mixtures of several styles (Roman, Gothic and Renaissance). During the Wars of Religion, the souding of its bell marked the beginning of the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, when thousands of Huguenots were murdered. The north tower was added in 1860 as part of the Mairie of the 1st Arrondissement.
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