The organs of Paris
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Saint Leu

Saint Gilles 1 - 2

92 bis, rue Saint-Denis, 75001 Paris Orgue de tribune

<1600 - ??

1603 - Matthijs Langhedul

1619 - Pierre Pescheur

1659 - Guy Jolly

1671 - Enocq

1788 - Clicquot

1855 - Suret

1912 - Mutin

III/24 - mechanical traction - stoplist

Muet/silent (depuis/since 1974)

Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles, located in the heart of Paris, dates back to the 13th Century (1230). It is one of the few religious monuments left from that period, standing along the old Roman road (Rue Saint Denis) leading to Saint-Denis, Pontoise and Rouen, which later became the triumphal road for royal entries into the capital. When Saint-Gilles chapel became too small in the 14th Century, the current Saint-Leu church was built (1310), which explains the two saints in its name. It was reconstructed several times in the following centuries. Due to the break-through of the Boulevard Sébastopol, the choir was shortened with 5 meters and three chapels were demolished mid 19th century. Victor Baltard restorated the church, adding lateral chapels. Also, a tower and clock were added (1858). The nave is built in gothic style, whereas the choir is built in renaissance-style. The church is the home of an ancient religious alliance, les Chevaliers du Saint Sépulcre de Jérusalem.
The organ of Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles was built in 1788 by François-Henri Clicquot in the case of the former organ built by Guy Jolly in 1658-1659, which was an extension of an organ built before 1580 and modified by Mathieu Langhedul (1603) and Pierre Pescheur (1619). The frame- work of the organ still dates to this ancient organ (before 1600). Jolly added the positif and Clicquot the lateral extension of the case of the GO. In addition, Clicquot entirely renewed the instrument itself. Restorations were carried out by Suret (1855) and Mutin (1912). The organ has 14 stops from before the revolution (11 completely, 3 partial) and 9-10 stops of Suret and 2 stops of Mutin. In 1974 the organ was damaged by a fire and since then the organ has been silent. It awaits an comprehensive restoration. An association was founded in 2012 to raise funds for such a restoration. Video of the organ in its present state. Site of the organ Brochure
In the plan to maintain the cultural heritage of the City of Paris, this organ is among the four prestigious and emblematic instruments, classified as Historic Monuments, requiring a fundamental restoration. Restoration issues The first known interventions of organ builders in Saint- Leu-Saint-Gilles date back to 1619: the organ builder Pescheur then modified and enlarged the original organ but retained its buffet: the instrument was still modest in size with a keyboard and a pedal ‘en tirasse’. In the mid- 17th century, it is certain that the instrument was no longer sufficient for the new musical repertoire of the time and the needs of the liturgy. As early as 1637, the organ builder Jolly carried the instrument almost to the dimensions that we know it today by adding a Positive. In 1659, the organ consisted of 27 stops. In 1671, Enocq added a fourth keyboard, expanded the scope of the pedal and changed ten stops, but did not fundamentally alter the sound characteristics. François-Henri Clicquot's intervention deeply marks the instrument since most of the mechanics, more than 60% of the piping and an important part of the buffet can be attributed to him. Suret modified the Clicquot organ without distorting it in 1855, among others: the addition of an expressive keyboard, the consequent removal of the Récit and Echo keyboards, the modification of the composition of certain keyboards and the change of the keyboards of the console... Mutin intervened in 1911-1912, probably to repair some damage that occurred during the Paris Commune and modernize the organ "to the taste of the day", among others: removal of the French pedal, reharmonization of the Plein Jeu, addition of harmonic reed stops. Unfortunately, in 1974, a fire caused extensive damage. Since then, it has been totally unplayable. The current condition of the instrument requires a major restoration: cleaning of the mechanics and piping, reconstruction of the missing pipes, complete restoration of the wind chests, repair of the console, resumption of power and treatment of the buffet. The preliminary study is to be carried out by a state consultant technician. Call to Patronage: 2,280,000 euros, exclusive the costs associated with the project management are added to this amount and will be borne by the City of Paris. Source
The organs of Paris

Saint Leu

Saint Gilles 1 - 2

92 bis, rue Saint-Denis, 75001 Paris Orgue de tribune

<1600 - ??

1603 - Matthijs Langhedul

1619 - Pierre Pescheur

1659 - Guy Jolly

1671 - Enocq

1788 - Clicquot

1855 - Suret

1912 - Mutin

III/24 - mechanical traction - stoplist

Muet/silent (depuis/since 1974)

Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles, located in the heart of Paris, dates back to the 13th Century (1230). It is one of the few religious monuments left from that period, standing along the old Roman road (Rue Saint Denis) leading to Saint-Denis, Pontoise and Rouen, which later became the triumphal road for royal entries into the capital. When Saint-Gilles chapel became too small in the 14th Century, the current Saint-Leu church was built (1310), which explains the two saints in its name. It was reconstructed several times in the following centuries. Due to the break-through of the Boulevard Sébastopol, the choir was shortened with 5 meters and three chapels were demolished mid 19th century. Victor Baltard restorated the church, adding lateral chapels. Also, a tower and clock were added (1858). The nave is built in gothic style, whereas the choir is built in renaissance-style. The church is the home of an ancient religious alliance, les Chevaliers du Saint Sépulcre de Jérusalem. The organ of Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles was built in 1788 by François-Henri Clicquot in the case of the former organ built by Guy Jolly in 1658-1659, which was an extension of an organ built before 1580 and moderated by Mathieu Langhedul (1603) and Pierre Pescheur (1619). The frame- work of the organ still dates to this ancient organ (before 1580). The lateral extension of the case of the GO and case of the positif is done by Clicquot, as is the instrument itself. Restorations were carried out by Suret (1855) and Mutin (1912). In 1974 the organ was damaged by a fire and since then, the organ is not playable anymore. It awaits an comprehensive restoration. An association was founded in 2012 to raise funds for such a restoration. The organ has 14 stops from before the revolution (11 completely, 3 partial) and 9-10 stops of Suret and 2 stops of Mutin. So, a considerable part of the instrument of Clicquot is preserved, an exciting notion, which raises the question which principles should be the guidance for a future restoration of this unique instrument. Video of the organ in its present state. Site of the organ Brochure
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