The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © 2021 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME ALL ORGANS

Saint Louis en l'Ile 1-2

19 bis, rue Saint-louis-en-l'ile, 75004 Paris Orgue de tribune

2004 - Aubertin

III/51 - mechanical traction - stoplist

Saint-Louis-en-l’ile, built in a baroque style, is reminiscent of St. Paul-Saint-Louis, located in the same arondissement. It was built from 1656 to 1726 by the architect François Le Vau (1613- 1676), whose younger brother, Louis Le Vau, is best known for having been one of the architects of the Palace of Versailles. Built according to a Gothic plan, but of modern design with Italian inspiration, the church is the only 17th century church combining a flat apse with an ambulatory. Until the early 17th century, St. Louis Island was uninhabited. The erection of the first houses was followed by a petition for a place of worship. In 1623, a first chapel was built, dedicated to Our Lady of the Island. Having become too small, it was decided to build a real church. During the Revolution, the church was closed (1791). The interior is looted and then used as a book repository. The building was sold as a national property in 1798. Returned to worship by the purchaser, Pope Pius VII celebrated Mass there in 1805. The City of Paris bought it in 1817 and embellished it: abundant gilding, murals, stucco sculptures, stained glass windows, etc. The interior decoration of the church was reportedly entrusted to Jean-Baptiste de Champagne (1631-1681), nephew of the famous painter Philippe de Champagne. The decoration was carried out soberly, in a style similar to that of the Church of St. Jacques du Haut Pas, all the current gilding dating only from the 19th century. Thanks to the patronage of a family and the commitment of the Avenir du Patrimoine Foundation, the clock of the church has been restored in 2018.
Photo GO: Jeroen de Haan Photos console : Victor Weller The current organ was built in 2004-2005 by Bernard Aubertin. Its design is based on the style of Zacharias Hildenbrandt, who was one of Johann-Sebastian Bach's favorite organ builders. The church was originally equipped with an organ built by Lesclop in 1745. It was destroyed during the Revolution and only a drawing of the buffet reached us. It was not until 1888 that Father Bossuet, parish priest, had an organ buffet installed at his own expense, which remained empty for many years because of the lack of money from the parish, which could only rent a small Merklin organ of 15 stops. In 1923, it was finally possible to house an instrument of 34 stops in this vast buffet. The instrument was built by Mutin and survived unaltered at the dawn of the 20th century. It is now stored, waiting for a new home. Of the former organ of Mutin, only two statues were conserved and placed on the top of the new organcase. Site of the organ
From January, 7, 2019 onwards for a period of three years, this organ will be silent, being covered with a hammer-cloth for protection during restoration works of the roof of the church. Some concerts are moved to Temple du Foyer de l'Âme.
Former organ of Mutin (1924), in a case dating to the end of the 19th century.
Organiste titulaire Benjamin Allard Concerts Regularly

Masses with organ

Saturday 6.30p.m., Sunday 11a.m. Videos Vincent Rigot (former co-titulaire)
The organs of Paris

Saint Louis en l'Ile

1-2

19 bis, rue Saint-louis-en-l'ile, 75004 Paris Orgue de tribune

2004 - Aubertin

III/51 - mechanical traction - stoplist

ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt ALL ORGANS
From January, 7, 2019 onwards for a period of three years, this organ will be silent, being covered with a hammer-cloth for protection during restoration works of the roof of the church. Some concerts are moved to Temple du Foyer de l'Âme.
Photo GO: Jeroen de Haan Photos console : Victor Weller The current organ was built in 2004-2005 by Bernard Aubertin. Its design is based on the style of Zacharias Hildenbrandt, who was one of Johann-Sebastian Bach's favorite organ builders. The church was originally equipped with an organ built by Lesclop in 1745. It was destroyed during the Revolution and only a drawing of the buffet reached us. It was not until 1888 that Father Bossuet, parish priest, had an organ buffet installed at his own expense, which remained empty for many years because of the lack of money from the parish, which could only rent a small Merklin organ of 15 stops. In 1923, it was finally possible to house an instrument of 34 stops in this vast buffet. The instrument was built by Mutin and survived unaltered at the dawn of the 20th century. It is now stored, waiting for a new home. Of the former organ of Mutin, only two statues were conserved and placed on the top of the new organcase. Site of the organ
Organiste titulaire Benjamin Allard Concerts Regularly

Masses with organ

Saturday 6.30p.m., Sunday 11a.m. Videos Vincent Rigot (former co-titulaire)