The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0  © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt                  HOME                                   S-Z           

Saint Merry  1  -  2  

76, rue de la Verrerie, 75004 Paris Orgue de tribune

1651 - Jean et François De Héman

1719/36 - Collard

1755 - Slodtz

1778/82 - F.H. Clicquot (1778/82)

1816 - Dallery

1822 - Abbey

1857 - Cavaillé-Coll

1947 - Gonzalez

2000 - Dargassies

IV/64 (58) -

mechanical traction (manuals)

electrical (stops) - stoplist
St-Merry was built between 1510 and 1552 in a flamboyant Gothic style, replcing earlier churches, dating back to the 7th century. In the 18th century, some renovations were carried out in a baroque style. The bell tower contains the oldest bell in Paris, cast in 1331. The church has the same layout as Notre-Dame cathedrals: the length of the choir is almost the same as the length of the nave, hence its nickname "Small Notre-Dame". The stained glass windows of the nave dates back to the 16th century. Organiste titulaire  Jean-Marc Leblanc - Stéphane Béchy Famous organists in the past: Nicolas Lebégue (1630-1702), Jean-François Dandrieu (1681-1738) et Camille Saint-Saëns (1835- 1921), Norbert Dufourq (1923-1990). Concerts  Seldomly

Masses with organ

Saturday 6.30 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. Videos 3 Noëls français (Bechy) Böhm Praeludium und fuge C-dur (Litaize)
The organ case is made by Germain Pilon in 1647. The instrument itself was built by Jean and Francois De Héman, probably using parts of a former organ. The tribune and the positif-case were modified by the brothers Slodtz in 1755. In 1778, 1782 and 1791, the organ was rebuilt by Francois-Henri Clicquot and Claude- Francois Clicquot. In 1857 the organ was reconstructed by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll. In 1947, Victor Gonzalez carried out a hybrid restauration, adding some new stops. In 1999-2000, Dargassies restored the Barker machine, the wind system, added a new air-supply and repaired some urgent problems concerning the pipework. A substantial part of the pipework dates still from before the revolution. The wind-chest of the GO and positif are from Clicquot. The Montre 16' GO and the Trompette 8' GO dates to the 17th century. The majority of the principals, flutes and anches are from Clicquot. Despite its extensive history of modifications, renovations, reconstructions and restaurations, this organ seems still a potentially great representative of the classical French organ. It deserves a comprehensive restauration to show its former glory again! Site of the organ Photo below: Jeroen de Haan
The organs of Paris

Saint Merry  1  -  2  

76, rue de la Verrerie, 75004 Paris Orgue de tribune

1651 - Jean et François De Héman

1719/36 - Collard

1755 - Slodtz

1778/82 - F.H. Clicquot (1778/82)

1816 - Dallery

1822 - Abbey

1857 - Cavaillé-Coll

1947 - Gonzalez

2000 - Dargassies

IV/64 (58) -

mechanical traction (manuals)

electrical (stops) - stoplist
St-Merry was built between 1510 and 1552 in a flamboyant Gothic style, replcing earlier churches, dating back to the 7th century. In the 18th century, some renovations were carried out in a baroque style. The bell tower contains the oldest bell in Paris, cast in 1331.  The church has the same layout as Notre-Dame cathedrals: the length of the choir is almost the same as the length of the nave, hence its nickname "Small Notre-Dame". The stained glass windows of the nave dates back to the 16th century.  The organ case is made by Germain Pilon in 1647. The instrument itself was built by Jean and Francois De Héman, probably using parts of a former organ. The tribune and the positif-case were modified by the brothers Slodtz in 1755. In 1778, 1782 and 1791, the organ was rebuilt by Francois-Henri Clicquot and Claude-Francois Clicquot. In 1857 the organ was reconstructed by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll. In 1947, Victor Gonzalez carried out a hybrid restauration, adding some new stops. In 1999-2000, Dargassies restored the Barker machine, the wind system, added a new air-supply and repaired some urgent problems concerning the pipework.  A substantial part of the pipework dates still from before the revolution. The wind-chest of the GO and positif are from Clicquot. The Montre 16' GO and the Trompette 8' GO dates to the 17th century. The majority of the principals, flutes and anches are from Clicquot. Despite its extensive history of modifications, renovations, reconstructions and restaurations, this organ seems still a potentially great representative of the classical French organ. It deserves a comprehensive restauration to show its former glory again!  Site of the organ  Organiste titulaire  Jean-Marc Leblanc - Stéphane Béchy Famous organists in the past: Nicolas Lebégue (1630-1702), Jean-François Dandrieu (1681-1738) et Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921), Norbert Dufourq (1923-1990). Concerts  occasionally Masses with organ Saturday 6.30 PM Sunday 10 AM Videos 3 Noëls français (Bechy) Böhm Praeludium und fuge C-dur (Litaize)
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