The organs of Paris
ORGUES DE PARIS 2.0  © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt                  HOME                                   S-Z           

Saint Augustin

Place Saint-Augustin,  75008 Paris Orgue de tribune

1868 - Barker

1989 - Cavaillé-Coll

1945/62 - Beuchet-Debierre

1987 - Dargassies

III/54 - mechanical traction -

stoplist

Orgue d'accompagnement sur tribune

1899 - Mutin

1973 - Gonzalez

1983 - Dargassies

II/30 (21) - electrical traction - stoplist

photo’s GO/OdC: Jeroen de Haan
Saint-Augustin was built between 1860 and 1871 by Victor Baltard in an eclectic style combining Gothic and Romanesque elements. It is almost 100 metres in length, with a dome of 80 metres in height, and was one of the first great buildings in Paris constructed around a metal frame. This church is a good example of the Parisan architecture during the Second French Empire, directed by Baron Haussmann, with many rectilinear avenues, which called for prestigious buildings at prominent locations. Organiste titulaire Didier Matry & Christophe Martin-Maëder Famous organists in the past: Eugène Gigout, Jean Hure, André Fleury, Suzanne Chaisemartin Concerts  Regularly

Masses with organ

Saturday 6.30PM, Sunday 10AM, 11AM, 19PM Videos Didier Matry
The organ was built by Charles Barker & Albert Peschard and inaugurated in 1868. It was an innovative instrument, the first organ equipped with an electro - pneumatic transmission (type Peschard - not to be confused wioth the type Schmoele-Mol which was used by Merklin). In 1870 this system was improved by Paul Férat, one of the pupils of Charles Barker. In 1889, the maintenance was given to Cavaillé-Coll (i.c. his son Gabriel, who was the expert on electricity). However, shortly afterwards, Gabriel left the company and Cavaillé-Coll decided tot carry out a major reconstruction of the organ, with the replacement of the electro - pneumatic transmission by a mechanical transmission assisted by the Barker lever, the extension of the three keyboards to 56 notes and the pedal to 30 notes, and the addition of 9 stops. The new organ was inaugurated in 1899 by Eugène Gigout. In 1925, Charles Mutin extended the instrument to 54 stops, and in 1962 the Beuchet company (i.c. Picaud) added mixtures on each manual and replaced the clarinette of the positif with a cromorne. A restoration amd reharmonisation was carried out in 1988 by Bernard Dargassies, attempting to return to the original symphonic instrument.
The organs of Paris

Saint Augustin

Place Saint-Augustin,  75008 Paris Orgue de tribune

1868 - Barker

1989 - Cavaillé-Coll

1945/62 - Beuchet-Debierre

1987 - Dargassies

III/54 - mechanical traction -

stoplist

Orgue d'accompagnement sur tribune

1899 - Mutin

1973 - Gonzalez

1983 - Dargassies

II/30 (21) - electrical traction - stoplist

photo’s GO/OdC: Jeroen de Haan
ORGUES DE PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt     HOME       S-Z
Saint-Augustin was built between 1860 and 1871 by Victor Baltard in an eclectic style combining Gothic and Romanesque elements. It is almost 100 metres in length, with a dome of 80 metres in height, and was one of the first great buildings in Paris constructed around a metal frame. This church is a good example of the Parisan architecture during the Second French Empire, directed by Baron Haussmann, with many rectilinear avenues, which called for prestigious buildings at prominent locations. The organ was built by Charles Barker & Albert Peschard and inaugurated in 1868. It was an innovative instrument, the first organ equipped with an electro - pneumatic transmission (type Peschard - not to be confused wioth the type Schmoele-Mol which was used by Merklin). In 1870 this system was improved by Paul Férat, one of the pupils of Charles Barker. In 1889, the maintenance was given to Cavaillé-Coll (i.c. his son Gabriel, who was the expert on electricity). However, shortly afterwards, Gabriel left the company and Cavaillé-Coll decided tot carry out a major reconstruction of the organ, with the replacement of the electro - pneumatic transmission by a mechanical transmission assisted by the Barker lever, the extension of the three keyboards to 56 notes and the pedal to 30 notes, and the addition of 9 stops. The new organ was inaugurated in 1899 by Eugène Gigout. In 1925, Charles Mutin extended the instrument to 54 stops, and in 1962 the Beuchet company (i.c. Picaud) added mixtures on each manual and replaced the clarinette of the positif with a cromorne. A restoration amd reharmonisation was carried out in 1988 by Bernard Dargassies, attempting to return to the original symphonic instrument. Organiste titulaire Didier Matry Famous organists in the past: Eugène Gigout, Jean Hure, André Fleury, Suzanne Chaisemartin Concerts  Regularly

Masses with organ

Saturday 6.30PM, Sunday 10AM, 11AM, 19PM Videos Didier Matry